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Homebrew Crew - what you been brewing?, Part Deux

  • ZCavaricci21757 said... (original post)

    It all depends on what you are brewing. A month is a good time frame to use. I hurry along hoppy beers (2 to 3 weeks) and let big stouts, Belgians and sours sit anywhere from 3 months to a year. I also age some beers for months on wood, fruit, vanilla, bourbon etc.

    It was a wheat pale ale, let the primary fermentation go 8 days then transferred and did a secondary ferment w dry hopping for 3 weeks

  • moagersmynager said... (original post)

    It was a wheat pale ale, let the primary fermentation go 8 days then transferred and did a secondary ferment w dry hopping for 3 weeks

    Sounds good. Wheat beers are meant to be consumed fresh so if I were brewing a wheat I would do 3 weeks to a month.

  • Finally tasting my blueberry Berlinerweiss. Tastes great but you can tell it needs some more time. I toned down the sour perfectly. My only complaint is the aroma although that should change with age also.

  • TX Sparty

    Brewing a vanilla bourbon imperial porter this morning. Unemployment is awesome!

  • Just kegged a coconut porter - turned out great
    Pumpkin pie pale in the secondary
    Taking a stab at a SMaSH this weekend

  • TX Sparty said... (original post)

    Brewing a vanilla bourbon imperial porter this morning. Unemployment is awesome!

    Damn that sounds awesome

  • TX Sparty

    3SBC said... (original post)

    Damn that sounds awesome

    What does? The beer or being unemployed and able to brew during the weekend? lol

  • TX Sparty said... (original post)

    What does? The beer or being unemployed and able to brew during the weekend? lol

    Yes

  • FearsomePenguin

    My dog was going after cookies on top of the keezer and knocked open my amber ale faucet. About 1 1/2 gallons went to the carpet. I'm glad the keg was mostly gone.

  • Too Easy

    So last night I made my first ever batch of beer. I made an IPA. I bittered the wort at 60 with 1 oz of chinook, then Citra at 30, 15, and 5 all 1 ounces at a time. When I tested the OG, I took a sip and barely tasted any hop notes at all. I know it's just the wort and it comes out a totally different product, but am I supposed to be smacked up front by hops when brewing an IPA? That, and just being paranoid about sanitation has had me worried that it's going to come out like shit.

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    We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes.

  • Too Easy said... (original post)

    So last night I made my first ever batch of beer. I made an IPA. I bittered the wort at 60 with 1 oz of chinook, then Citra at 30, 15, and 5 all 1 ounces at a time. When I tested the OG, I took a sip and barely tasted any hop notes at all. I know it's just the wort and it comes out a totally different product, but am I supposed to be smacked up front by hops when brewing an IPA? That, and just being paranoid about sanitation has had me worried that it's going to come out like shit.

    Wort should have a lot of sugar, so it will taste....well, sweet.

    This post was edited by BH Spartan 5 months ago

  • Too Easy

    BH Spartan said... (original post)

    Wort should have a lot of sugar, so it will taste....well, sweet.

    right that's what I figured, but I just wanted to double check. Every book I've read agrees, but some on threads like homebrewtalk dont. so I thought I'd ask here, too.

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    We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes.

  • Too Easy said... (original post)

    right that's what I figured, but I just wanted to double check. Every book I've read agrees, but some on threads like homebrewtalk dont. so I thought I'd ask here, too.

    Honestly 3 ounces of hops isn't much for an IPA. Also the sweetness may hide some of the bitterness you are looking for. When fermentation dries the beer out those hops should come through. I would say you should taste those hops though. Did you have a vigorous boil ?

  • ZCavaricci21757 said... (original post)

    Honestly 3 ounces of hops isn't much for an IPA. Also the sweetness may hide some of the bitterness you are looking for. When fermentation dries the beer out those hops should come through. I would say you should taste those hops though. Did you have a vigorous boil ?

    He said 4oz with all high alpha. I'd just ferment it out and see. You'll know in a week!

    This post was edited by BH Spartan 5 months ago

  • Too Easy said... (original post)

    So last night I made my first ever batch of beer. I made an IPA. I bittered the wort at 60 with 1 oz of chinook, then Citra at 30, 15, and 5 all 1 ounces at a time. When I tested the OG, I took a sip and barely tasted any hop notes at all. I know it's just the wort and it comes out a totally different product, but am I supposed to be smacked up front by hops when brewing an IPA? That, and just being paranoid about sanitation has had me worried that it's going to come out like shit.

    FWIW, i always take a small taste of the sample pulled for gravity check, and it always tastes like crappy sugar water lol. taste your batch again after the fermentation completes in 30 days. thats right, i said 30 days.

    when i started brewing, it was 7-14 days fermentation and i would bottle it after taking multiple FG checks.... two problems with that. one, i thought it was tiresome to keep checking the FG to see if fermentation was complete, and two i also thought it was very UNsanitary to keep dipping into the batch - lots of contamination risk there.... so, when i learned that there is no harm in letting your batch sit on the yeast for 30 days, i concluded it was pretty much guaranteed to find that fermentation would fully complete in 30 days, but the bigger benefit was giving the yeast additional time to clean up their mess in the fermentation vessel, and therefore producing a much cleaner beer. let the yeast do what its there to do.

    ferment for 30 days. thank me later. cheers

    To Secondary or Not? John Palmer and Jamil Z

    Like a lot of brewers here on HBT, I've discovered that the transfer to a secondary fermenter really isn't necessary, unless I am doing something like

    http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/secondary-not-john-palmer-jamil-zainasheff-weigh-176837/

    This post was edited by john winger 5 months ago

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  • Too Easy

    Thanks for the feedback, guys.

    And yeah, it was 4 oz. total of both Citra and Chinook above 12% alpha calculated to about 70 IBUs total. I figured it wasn't anything to worry about, just wanted some feedback from the more seasoned.

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    We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes.

  • -------------------------------------

    There's been a shift in belief over the past few years, now most of us leave our beers in primary for a month rather than rack to a secondary, and find our beers are better for being on the yeast that time. And clearer.

    Fermenting the beer is just a part of what the yeast do. If you leave the beer alone, they will go back and clean up the byproducts of fermentation that often lead to off flavors. That's why many brewers skip secondary and leave our beers alone in primary for a month. It leaves plenty of time for the yeast to ferment, clean up after themselves and then fall out, leveing our beers crystal clear, with a tight yeast cake.

    If you leave the beer alone, they will go back and clean up the byproducts of fermentation that often lead to off flavors. That's why many brewers skip secondary and leave our beers alone in primary for a month. It leaves plenty of time for the yeast to ferment, clean up after themselves and then fall out, leveing our beers crystal clear, with a tight yeast cake.

    This is the latest recommendation, it is the same one many of us have been giving for several years on here.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by John Palmer

    Tom from Michigan asks:
    I have a few questions about secondary fermentations. I've read both pros and cons for 2nd fermentations and it is driving me crazy what to do. One, are they necessary for lower Gravity beers?
    Two, what is the dividing line between low gravity and high gravity beers? Is it 1.060 and higher?
    Three, I have an American Brown Ale in the primary right now, a SG of 1.058, Should I secondary ferment this or not?
    Your advice is appreciated, thanks for all you do!

    Allen from New York asks:
    John, please talk about why or why not you would NOT use a secondary fermenter (bright tank?) and why or why not a primary only fermentation is a good idea. In other words, give some clarification or reason why primary only is fine, versus the old theory of primary then secondary normal gravity ale fermentations.

    Palmer answers:
    These are good questions - When and why would you need to use a secondary fermenter? First some background - I used to recommend racking a beer to a secondary fermenter. My recommendation was based on the premise that (20 years ago) larger (higher gravity) beers took longer to ferment completely, and that getting the beer off the yeast reduced the risk of yeast autolysis (ie., meaty or rubbery off-flavors) and it allowed more time for flocculation and clarification, reducing the amount of yeast and trub carryover to the bottle. Twenty years ago, a homebrewed beer typically had better flavor, or perhaps less risk of off-flavors, if it was racked off the trub and clarified before bottling. Today that is not the case.

    The risk inherent to any beer transfer, whether it is fermenter-to-fermenter or fermenter-to-bottles, is oxidation and staling. Any oxygen exposure after fermentation will lead to staling, and the more exposure, and the warmer the storage temperature, the faster the beer will go stale.

    Racking to a secondary fermenter used to be recommended because staling was simply a fact of life - like death and taxes. But the risk of autolysis was real and worth avoiding - like cholera. In other words, you know you are going to die eventually, but death by cholera is worth avoiding.

    But then modern medicine appeared, or in our case, better yeast and better yeast-handling information. Suddenly, death by autolysis is rare for a beer because of two factors: the freshness and health of the yeast being pitched has drastically improved, and proper pitching rates are better understood. The yeast no longer drop dead and burst like Mr. Creosote from Monty Python's The Meaning of Life when fermentation is complete - they are able to hibernate and wait for the next fermentation to come around. The beer has time to clarify in the primary fermenter without generating off-flavors. With autolysis no longer a concern, staling becomes the main problem. The shelf life of a beer can be greatly enhanced by avoiding oxygen exposure and storing the beer cold (after it has had time to carbonate).

    Therefore I, and Jamil and White Labs and Wyeast Labs, do not recommend racking to a secondary fermenter for ANY ale, except when conducting an actual second fermentation, such as adding fruit or souring. Racking to prevent autolysis is not necessary, and therefore the risk of oxidation is completely avoidable. Even lagers do not require racking to a second fermenter before lagering. With the right pitching rate, using fresh healthy yeast, and proper aeration of the wort prior to pitching, the fermentation of the beer will be complete within 3-8 days (bigger = longer). This time period includes the secondary or conditioning phase of fermentation when the yeast clean up acetaldehyde and diacetyl. The real purpose of lagering a beer is to use the colder temperatures to encourage the yeast to flocculate and promote the precipitation and sedimentation of microparticles and haze.

    So, the new rule of thumb: don't rack a beer to a secondary, ever, unless you are going to conduct a secondary fermentation.
    THIS is where the latest discussion and all your questions answered.
    We have multiple threads about this all over the place, like this one,so we really don't need to go over it again, all the info you need is here;

    http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/secondary-not-john-palmer-jamil-zainasheff-weigh-176837/

    We basically proved that old theory wrong on here 5 years ago, and now the rest fo the brewing community is catching up. Though a lot of old dogs don't tend to follow the latest news, and perpetuate the old stuff.

    The autolysis from prolong yeast contact has fallen by the wayside, in fact yeast contact is now seen as a good thing.

    [b] All my beers sit a minimum of 1 month in the primary [/ b]. And I recently bottled a beer that sat in primary for 5.5 months with no ill effects...

    You'll find that more and more recipes these days do not advocate moving to a secondary at all, but mention primary for a month, which is starting to reflect the shift in brewing culture that has occurred in the last 4 years, MOSTLY because of many of us on here, skipping secondary, opting for longer primaries, and writing about it. Recipes in BYO have begun stating that in their magazine. I remember the "scandal" it caused i the letters to the editor's section a month later, it was just like how it was here when we began discussing it, except a lot more civil than it was here. But after the Byo/Basic brewing experiment, they started reflecting it in their recipes.

    -------------------------------

    This post has been edited 2 times, most recently by john winger 5 months ago

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    i only care about spartans --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqsAJQc-NCY

  • just re-racked my annual hard cider. Still has a lot of fermenting to do but tasting good so far. Think it still has a good week left before it's done but I like to transfer it to the glass carboy after a week to get rid of some of the sediments, and be able to tell where the sediments are when I rack the final time to bottle.

    Really think it's gonna be a good batch this year thumbsup

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  • Too Easy

    john winger said... (original post)

    -------------------------------------

    There's been a shift in belief over the past few years, now most of us leave our beers in primary for a month rather than rack to a secondary, and find our beers are better for being on the yeast that time. And clearer.

    Fermenting the beer is just a part of what the yeast do. If you leave the beer alone, they will go back and clean up the byproducts of fermentation that often lead to off flavors. That's why many brewers skip secondary and leave our beers alone in primary for a month. It leaves plenty of time for the yeast to ferment, clean up after themselves and then fall out, leveing our beers crystal clear, with a tight yeast cake.

    If you leave the beer alone, they will go back and clean up the byproducts of fermentation that often lead to off flavors. That's why many brewers skip secondary and leave our beers alone in primary for a month. It leaves plenty of time for the yeast to ferment, clean up after themselves and then fall out, leveing our beers crystal clear, with a tight yeast cake.

    This is the latest recommendation, it is the same one many of us have been giving for several years on here. Quote: Originally Posted by John Palmer

    Tom from Michigan asks: I have a few questions about secondary fermentations. I've read both pros and cons for 2nd fermentations and it is driving me crazy what to do. One, are they necessary for lower Gravity beers? Two, what is the dividing line between low gravity and high gravity beers? Is it 1.060 and higher? Three, I have an American Brown Ale in the primary right now, a SG of 1.058, Should I secondary ferment this or not? Your advice is appreciated, thanks for all you do!

    Allen from New York asks: John, please talk about why or why not you would NOT use a secondary fermenter (bright tank?) and why or why not a primary only fermentation is a good idea. In other words, give some clarification or reason why primary only is fine, versus the old theory of primary then secondary normal gravity ale fermentations.

    Palmer answers: These are good questions - When and why would you need to use a secondary fermenter? First some background - I used to recommend racking a beer to a secondary fermenter. My recommendation was based on the premise that (20 years ago) larger (higher gravity) beers took longer to ferment completely, and that getting the beer off the yeast reduced the risk of yeast autolysis (ie., meaty or rubbery off-flavors) and it allowed more time for flocculation and clarification, reducing the amount of yeast and trub carryover to the bottle. Twenty years ago, a homebrewed beer typically had better flavor, or perhaps less risk of off-flavors, if it was racked off the trub and clarified before bottling. Today that is not the case.

    The risk inherent to any beer transfer, whether it is fermenter-to-fermenter or fermenter-to-bottles, is oxidation and staling. Any oxygen exposure after fermentation will lead to staling, and the more exposure, and the warmer the storage temperature, the faster the beer will go stale.

    Racking to a secondary fermenter used to be recommended because staling was simply a fact of life - like death and taxes. But the risk of autolysis was real and worth avoiding - like cholera. In other words, you know you are going to die eventually, but death by cholera is worth avoiding.

    But then modern medicine appeared, or in our case, better yeast and better yeast-handling information. Suddenly, death by autolysis is rare for a beer because of two factors: the freshness and health of the yeast being pitched has drastically improved, and proper pitching rates are better understood. The yeast no longer drop dead and burst like Mr. Creosote from Monty Python's The Meaning of Life when fermentation is complete - they are able to hibernate and wait for the next fermentation to come around. The beer has time to clarify in the primary fermenter without generating off-flavors. With autolysis no longer a concern, staling becomes the main problem. The shelf life of a beer can be greatly enhanced by avoiding oxygen exposure and storing the beer cold (after it has had time to carbonate).

    Therefore I, and Jamil and White Labs and Wyeast Labs, do not recommend racking to a secondary fermenter for ANY ale, except when conducting an actual second fermentation, such as adding fruit or souring. Racking to prevent autolysis is not necessary, and therefore the risk of oxidation is completely avoidable. Even lagers do not require racking to a second fermenter before lagering. With the right pitching rate, using fresh healthy yeast, and proper aeration of the wort prior to pitching, the fermentation of the beer will be complete within 3-8 days (bigger = longer). This time period includes the secondary or conditioning phase of fermentation when the yeast clean up acetaldehyde and diacetyl. The real purpose of lagering a beer is to use the colder temperatures to encourage the yeast to flocculate and promote the precipitation and sedimentation of microparticles and haze.

    So, the new rule of thumb: don't rack a beer to a secondary, ever, unless you are going to conduct a secondary fermentation. THIS is where the latest discussion and all your questions answered. We have multiple threads about this all over the place, like this one,so we really don't need to go over it again, all the info you need is here;

    http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/secondary-not-john-palmer-jamil-zainasheff-weigh-176837/

    We basically proved that old theory wrong on here 5 years ago, and now the rest fo the brewing community is catching up. Though a lot of old dogs don't tend to follow the latest news, and perpetuate the old stuff.

    The autolysis from prolong yeast contact has fallen by the wayside, in fact yeast contact is now seen as a good thing.

    [b] All my beers sit a minimum of 1 month in the primary [/ b]. And I recently bottled a beer that sat in primary for 5.5 months with no ill effects...

    You'll find that more and more recipes these days do not advocate moving to a secondary at all, but mention primary for a month, which is starting to reflect the shift in brewing culture that has occurred in the last 4 years, MOSTLY because of many of us on here, skipping secondary, opting for longer primaries, and writing about it. Recipes in BYO have begun stating that in their magazine. I remember the "scandal" it caused i the letters to the editor's section a month later, it was just like how it was here when we began discussing it, except a lot more civil than it was here. But after the Byo/Basic brewing experiment, they started reflecting it in their recipes.

    -------------------------------

    so if i dry hop the beer in 2 weeks or so, should i just do it right into the primary?

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    We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes.

  • Too Easy said... (original post)

    so if i dry hop the beer in 2 weeks or so, should i just do it right into the primary?

    thats what i do around day 26

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    i only care about spartans --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqsAJQc-NCY

  • Too Easy said... (original post)

    so if i dry hop the beer in 2 weeks or so, should i just do it right into the primary?

    You can do it either way. I tend to move IPAs to secondary to clarify them and don't like the hops sitting in the trub for 2 weeks. I think dry hopping works better in secondary.

    But other times I'm lazy and throw it in primary.

  • BH Spartan said... (original post)

    You can do it either way. I tend to move IPAs to secondary to clarify them and don't like the hops sitting in the trub for 2 weeks. I think dry hopping works better in secondary.

    But other times I'm lazy and throw it in primary.

    speaking of clarity, one thing i do right before bottling is something i call "cold crashing". im sure that i didnt invent this term or technique, but cold crashing is what i call it. i have a johnson temperature controller and a mini-fridge. i set the controller to around 48 degrees and put the primary/secondary in the fridge for a good 3 days at the colder temp. the cold temp will pull all the trubs and sediments etc down to the bottom and clear the beer up nicely. when the 30 day primary is combined with the cold crashing, ive achieved incredibly clear beer and enjoyed a nice crisp taste/flavor benefit as well.

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    i only care about spartans --> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqsAJQc-NCY

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  • Too Easy

    Could someone help me out with a saison recipe?

    It's going to be my 4th batch. So far I've done a failed IPA, a pretty good Coffee Milk Stout, and currently have an IPA in the fermenter as I've learned my mistakes from my first batch.

    I'm just curious to what the base malts should be? I should note that as a beginner I'm using extract and speciality grains in all of my brews so far.

    Thanks

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    We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes.

  • Too Easy said... (original post)

    Could someone help me out with a saison recipe?

    It's going to be my 4th batch. So far I've done a failed IPA, a pretty good Coffee Milk Stout, and currently have an IPA in the fermenter as I've learned my mistakes from my first batch.

    I'm just curious to what the base malts should be? I should note that as a beginner I'm using extract and speciality grains in all of my brews so far.

    Thanks

    Saison should be mostly if not all pilsner.

    Good luck. It's a tough beer to make, especially when using spices.

    Edit: Just saw you were an extract brewer. If you are new to building recipes, go to northern brewer and see what ingredients are in their kits. Always a good starting place.

    This post was edited by BH Spartan 3 months ago