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RE; Weight loss and health.. one "chemical/additive" to avoid

  • thephoneman said... (original post)

    A million downvotes to the guy who lacks reading comprehension and is ignorant on the subject.

    If you don't know what you're talking about, you shouldn't go on the attack. lolthumbsup

    Diet sodas are one of the worst things you can put in your body.

    You have absolutely no idea about weight loss and/or diet if you're telling someone to drink these in any way, shape, or form.

    There are any number of products that one can use to wean themselves off of the sugar and caffeine rush of soda, such as coffee, tea, sparkling water…the list goes on and on. The absolute first thing one should cut out of their diets if they are serious about weight loss is soda, diet or otherwise.

    Advocating this makes you about as credible as Dr. Phil.

    This post was edited by Jim Shorts 3 years ago

    Always Smooth.

  • thephoneman said... (original post)

    A million downvotes to the guy who lacks reading comprehension and is ignorant on the subject.

    If you don't know what you're talking about, you shouldn't go on the attack. lolthumbsup

    You should take your own advice.

    "No one cares what you know, until they know how much you care." Mark Dantonio

  • Jim Shorts said... (original post)

    Diet sodas are one of the worst things you can put in your body.

    You have absolutely no idea about weight loss and/or diet if you're telling someone to drink these in any way, shape, or form.

    There are any number of products that one can use to wean themselves off of the sugar and caffeine rush of soda, such as coffee, tea, sparkling water…the list goes on and on. The absolute first thing one should cut out of their diets if they are serious about weight loss is soda, diet or otherwise.

    Advocating this makes you about as credible as Dr. Phil.

    Bullshit, you can drink diet soda and be lean if you want, in fact you can eat pretty much anything you what if done at the proper time and in the proper amount. Saying otherwise is just some fat body bullshit, or maybe you heard it from your chiropractor while they were rubbing crystals in your butt crack to cure your allergies.

  • Tyler Durden said... (original post)

    Bullshit, you can drink diet soda and be lean if you want, in fact you can eat pretty much anything you what if done at the proper time and in the proper amount. Saying otherwise is just some fat body bullshit, or maybe you heard it from your chiropractor while they were rubbing crystals in your butt crack to cure your allergies.

    Actually diet soda has been shown to have the same affect on you as eating regular sugar when it comes to insulin release. As I said above insulin release forces the body into storage mode. Honestly though, I'm not sure why anyone is trying to get health advice here. The amount of tripe in here is astounding.

    Along with possible health concerns of sugar substitutes and caffeine overuse,[3][4] the effectiveness of diet soda as a weight loss tool should also be considered.
    Changing the food energy intake from one food will not necessarily change a person's overall food energy intake, or cause a person to lose weight. One study,[5] at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, reported by Sharon Fowler at the ADA annual meeting, actually suggested the opposite, where consumption of diet soda was correlated with weight gain. While Fowler did suggest that the undelivered expected calories from diet soda may stimulate the appetite, the correlation does not prove that consumption of diet soda caused the weight gain. The ADA has yet to issue an updated policy concerning diet soda.
    An independent study by researchers with the Framingham Heart Study in Massachusetts, has turned up results which indicate that the consumption of diet soda correlates with increased metabolic syndrome. Of the 9,000 males and females studied, findings stated that 48% of the subjects were at higher risk for weight gain and elevated blood sugar. The researchers also acknowledged that diet soda drinkers were less likely to consume healthy foods, and that drinking diet soda flavored with artificial sweeteners more than likely increases cravings for sugar flavored sweets.[6]
    A preliminary abstract presented by the University of Miami's Hannah Gardener linked daily consumption of diet soda to a 61% higher incidence of "vascular events" such as strokes and heart attacks, although Gardener acknowledged that these results could not be conclusively linked to harmful effects of diet soda itself, and may be the result of other behaviors.[7] The author stated confirmation was required prior to drawing conclusions. These studies were published as abstracts and presented at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal[8]
    Among individuals who drink several regular sodas per day, diet soda may be a better choice, according to a website on dieting.[9] Studies have also indicated that body mass gain is an unlikely consequence of artificial sweetener consumption.[10][11]
    Animal studies suggest that artificial sweeteners cause body weight gain, theoretically because of a faulty insulin response, at least in cattle and rats. Rats given sweeteners have steadily increased caloric intake, increased body weight, and increased adiposity (fatness).[12] Adding saccharin to the food of calves increases their body weight as well.[13]
    A study of almost 60,000 pregnant Danish women found that preterm birth was more common in women who drank diet soda than in those who drank sugar-sweetened soda. The study was not designed to determine if there was any cause and effect relationship.[14][15]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diet_soda#Health_concerns

    http://maleweightlossnow.com/why-diet-soda-will-actually-make-you-fatter/

    This post has been edited 2 times, most recently by BigDaddyRos 3 years ago

  • Beardy

    All this from (I'm paraphrasing):

    "It might be hard to break the habit cold turkey. It might work better to reduce the amount over time until you're not drinking any."

  • Royal

    I hate it when people debate "weight loss" advice over and over again. Truth is, many people know the answer but they're not willing to do the work for it.

    No pop, fruit juice, bacon, pork, cheese, dressing/sauces or beer. Cut your intake of red meat in half, if you eat it more than 6 meals per week. Work out doing something, anything, for an hour straight, every day. Try it, fatties, and see what happens.

  • I love how people justify high fructose corn syrup or "corn sugar" by stating that it's the same as real sugar, as if real sugar is good for you

  • Trevor Barnes

  • Royal said... (original post)

    I hate it when people debate "weight loss" advice over and over again. Truth is, many people know the answer but they're not willing to do the work for it.

    No pop, fruit juice, bacon, pork, cheese, dressing/sauces or beer. Cut your intake of red meat in half, if you eat it more than 6 meals per week. Work out doing something, anything, for an hour straight, every day. Try it, fatties, and see what happens.

    But yet you really only know half the truth. There is nothing wrong with red meat or cheese. People that adopt a lifestyle geared towards ketosis styles of eating improve their health dramatically in all areas, not just weight. My blood sugar, cholesterol, weight and blood pressure all improved incredibly quickly by eliminating the bulk of carbohydrates from my diet.

    All I really did though was eat less and move more. Log everything you eat and set a calorie limit. It's really not difficult. People just don't want to do it or say they don't have the time.

    I work about 50 hours a week but still find time for about 2 hours of exercise a day.

  • I wouldn't say there is one chemical/additive to avoid because that's overly simplistic. You could name the ones that are more notoriously bad like HFCS, or you could say that all additives are bad because they indicate that you're not eating real food, but rather some lab-created approximation of food. But in general I don't like approaches that focus on a single nutrient/ingredient as either good or bad, because it implies that moderation isn't the real, attainable goal. You have people in this thread saying that carbs are bad. Really? Fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains are bad? People just cling to overly simplistic sound bites.

    When I was fat I just didn't know how to eat. I'm still surprised sometimes by how little I need to eat to maintain a healthy weight, but that's just because my whole life was lived with such unrealistic standards. Blah blah blah anyway the way I learned how to eat was Weight Watchers, I've lost and kept off 80 lbs (ok, 77) over the last 6 years.

    I'll sum the program up quick here.
    - You are given a set number of points per day based on your weight and gender (for example I have 26, the lowest it goes), plus an additional 49 points to use as you want throughout the week.
    - Food is assigned points based on its fat, carb, protein, and fiber grams. Fruits and vegetables have zero points. It varies by nutritional content but in general one point ~ 35-40 calories.
    - You also earn additional points through activity (based on your weight and the intensity of the activity). I can earn 4 points by running for 21 minutes or walking for 57.
    - Stay within your points target and you will lose weight. Doesn't matter what you eat. But you'll notice that over time you feel more satisfied on your points allotment when you choose whole foods with some fiber and protein. Go ahead and have that piece of cake for 12-15 points, or slice of Jet's pizza for 10 points, just budget for it. It's not as dramatic as 'cut out all carbs panic' or 'don't drink alcohol' but that's why it works. It can work with anyone's lifestyle.

  • If my sweat tastes like mayonnaise, should I be concerned?

  • MSURed said... (original post)

    I wouldn't say there is one chemical/additive to avoid because that's overly simplistic. You could name the ones that are more notoriously bad like HFCS, or you could say that all additives are bad because they indicate that you're not eating real food, but rather some lab-created approximation of food. But in general I don't like approaches that focus on a single nutrient/ingredient as either good or bad, because it implies that moderation isn't the real, attainable goal. You have people in this thread saying that carbs are bad. Really? Fruits, vegetables, beans, and whole grains are bad? People just cling to overly simplistic sound bites.

    When I was fat I just didn't know how to eat. I'm still surprised sometimes by how little I need to eat to maintain a healthy weight, but that's just because my whole life was lived with such unrealistic standards. Blah blah blah anyway the way I learned how to eat was Weight Watchers, I've lost and kept off 80 lbs (ok, 77) over the last 6 years.

    I'll sum the program up quick here.
    - You are given a set number of points per day based on your weight and gender (for example I have 26, the lowest it goes), plus an additional 49 points to use as you want throughout the week.
    - Food is assigned points based on its fat, carb, protein, and fiber grams. Fruits and vegetables have zero points. It varies by nutritional content but in general one point ~ 35-40 calories.
    - You also earn additional points through activity (based on your weight and the intensity of the activity). I can earn 4 points by running for 21 minutes or walking for 57.
    - Stay within your points target and you will lose weight. Doesn't matter what you eat. But you'll notice that over time you feel more satisfied on your points allotment when you choose whole foods with some fiber and protein. Go ahead and have that piece of cake for 12-15 points, or slice of Jet's pizza for 10 points, just budget for it. It's not as dramatic as 'cut out all carbs panic' or 'don't drink alcohol' but that's why it works. It can work with anyone's lifestyle.

    The main reason to steer away from carbs is the insulin release that throws your efforts in reverse until those sugars are processed.

    A secondary reason is that your body experiences high saiety from fats in comparison to carbs. While the volume of the food is less, your body will feel more satisfied with a diet higher in fats. Try avocados, almonds etc if you are afraid of big bad dairy and meat.

  • Jim Shorts said... (original post)

    High Fructose Corn Syrup - good luck, it's in almost everything

    It's the reason we're a nation of fatass slobs.

    Not just HFCS but also processed sugar. The body cannot break down the sucrose that is half of the processed sugar molecule. Unprocessed sugar, pure cane sugar or the substitutes like Stevia are significantly better for you.

    "If you have the right to be offended I have the right to offend you." - Ricky Gervais

  • BigDaddyRos said... (original post)

    The main reason to steer away from carbs is the insulin release that throws your efforts in reverse until those sugars are processed.

    A secondary reason is that your body experiences high saiety from fats in comparison to carbs. While the volume of the food is less, your body will feel more satisfied with a diet higher in fats. Try avocados, almonds etc if you are afraid of big bad dairy and meat.

    Sure but the carbs I listed are all low-glycemic index foods that contain fiber, meaning that the glucose is released slowly, and the fiber contributes to satiety. Additionally they are all nutritious. People follow their different programs and if they work for them, then good, but most people are going to have problems avoiding carbs their whole lives, and if the diet you're following isn't going to work for your life, aren't you just setting yourself up for failure?

  • It isn't rocket science to lose weight. I am not a huge label reader, I do sometimes, but I follow some common sense stuff and it works.

    1. Don't eat anything heavy after dinner.
    2. Drink lots of water, and start drinking water instead of sugary drinks.
    3. Exercise. I do cardio and then weight training.

    It isn't as hard as you think. I also cut out fast food, completely. This means Wendy's. McDs, Taco Bell, etc. However, I will eat pizza once or twice a month, it is too good.

    Just start doing these things on a regular basis, and you will change your lifestyle which is the goal. Once you start an exercise regimen, you will ask yourself how you ever went through life without working out.

  • Trevor Barnes

    MSURed said... (original post)

    Sure but the carbs I listed are all low-glycemic index foods that contain fiber, meaning that the glucose is released slowly, and the fiber contributes to satiety. Additionally they are all nutritious. People follow their different programs and if they work for them, then good, but most people are going to have problems avoiding carbs their whole lives, and if the diet you're following isn't going to work for your life, aren't you just setting yourself up for failure?

    I'm starting to wonder just how healthy jager bombs actually are...

  • It seems like everybody has their own opinion of what not to eat in order to lose weight. I've heard some people say to never eat fruit, there are low carb diets, there are low fat diets, no grain diets, natural food only diets, diet shakes, yada yada yada.

    The reason most of these diets actually work for some people is because it makes them actually think about what they are putting into their body, and they will eat less and under control. Most people really just need rules to follow or else they will eat a whole pint of ice cream tonight and worry about it tomorrow.

    Probably the worst thing I put into my body is alcohol. Not only because of the calories, but it lowers my inhibitions and I'll eat more crap, and if I'm hungover or tired the next day because I drank too much I'm less likely to work out and more likely to continue to eat like crap.

    So I'll chime in with what I always chime in with. The only thing I really try to limit in my diet are unnatural foods and alcohol. I think carbs are fine in moderation, they occur naturally and give you energy. There's a lot of debate between what types you should eat and when. My take is to just be smart about it, obviously carbs in fruits and vegetables are better than the ones in bread, pasta, and potatoes. We tend to eat way too much of those because they are comfort food and are usually plentiful.

    Also, exercise is huge. Not everyone needs to be a marathon runner but I believe it is very important to have a somewhat active lifestyle. Not just for your body but also for your mind. If you don't give the brain something to focus on it will usually just think about food....or sex. Survival instincts.

    This post was edited by ROtown Sparty 3 years ago

  • BigDaddyRos said... (original post)

    There are some very inherently wrong things with sugar in regards to weight loss. Sugar for all intents in purposes is almost toxic to your body in the amounts that are regularly consumed. To deal with it, your body releases insulin. Insulin causes everything you eat to be stored as fat until levels return to normal. There is a reason diabetic people are diabetic and it's from too much sugar. Your body needs about a teaspoon of sugar in your system to function.

    There is similar truth with alcohol. It is wasted calories that put your metabolism on hold until your body can process it out. Couple that with the amount of crap people tend to eat when they are drinking and it should be fairly simple to understand the problem.

    i definitely agree with you with respect to refined sugars as additive ingredients. HFCS, dextrose, and maltose are the scourge of the processed food industry. certainly a lot of sugar on its own will cause the insulin response to a drastic increase in blood sugar.

    however, you must have missed the part in my post about how most fruits do not cause a spike in blood sugar. it's not the sugar itself, necessarily, but how the body reacts to the food (or processed ingredients that resemble food).

    if you're eating food that comes in a box with an ingredient list, chances are sugar content is too high (to enhance flavor), and is dangerous in that it will cause an insulin response. mangoes, on the other hand, are also very high in sugar and extremely sweet, but they are also off the charts in antioxidant micronutrients to the point that many people consider mangoes to be a superfood.

    [blackapple]

  • Gomer

    BigDaddyRos said... (original post)

    But yet you really only know half the truth. There is nothing wrong with red meat

    Your colon may eventually tell you otherwise.

  • MSUcnturyclub19 said... (original post)

    Alcohol is 7 kcal/gram and decreases your testosterone production which makes it harder for your body to metabolize fat.

    The more I drink the manlier I feel. This can't be true!

  • Trevor Barnes said... (original post)

    I'm starting to wonder just how healthy jager bombs actually are...

    Nutritional powerhouses. The Monster has a lot of B-vitamins and there is no way you can convince me Jager is bad for you. I always feel great after having it! To a point.

  • Many ways to slice this cat. Take your time and try them all. Then try to combine a few thoughts. See what you like best. My two biggest pieces of advice if you want to lose and keep it off:

    1. Walk. Do not become a runner.
    2. In the beginning, one cheat day a week. Mine was Spartan football Saturdays. When you reach goal weight and have new lifestyle, 2 cheat days/ week.

  • Jim Shorts said... (original post)

    Diet sodas are one of the worst things you can put in your body.

    nerd The worst things you can put in your body are meth, heroin, jenkem, cocaine, and any bodily fluid from Tina (that fat bitch!). Diet pops are way down the list.

  • LP said... (original post)


    1. Walk. Do not become a runner.

    Is there a rationale here or are you just throwing that out.

  • FeMan said... (original post)

    Is there a rationale here or are you just throwing that out.

    Yep. I probably should have have personalized that statement but here are my reasons:

    1. Unless a lifelong runner who loves the running itself, a person will burn out mentally and physically.

    2. If an overweight person runs, much tougher on knees.

    3. Read this in good calories bad calories (not that I believe the whole book) but this made sense as I applied it to myself: running induces hunger and you end up eating more than if you walked or didn't run at all.

    4. Just my take. 3 miles in a workout. At 8a minute mile you're done in 24 minutes, hungry and sore. An hour walk and you've worked out for 36 more minutes, had time to get away from life, and not worked up such an appetite. Unscientific but my personal experience.