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RE; Weight loss and health.. one "chemical/additive" to avoid

  • no matter how fast you're going, you burn about 100 calories per mile. the stuff about hunger and time is all hand waving. i love running, but the important thing to do is find exercise that *you* enjoy and will look forward to doing. you can't lose weight by fixing your diet alone, so find something you enjoy and will do regularly without angst or a lot of motivational tricks.

    also, running isn't bad for your knees if you do it the right way. being fat, however, is very stressful to your knees, ankles, feet, and hips. so find something -- anything -- you enjoy doing and get out and do it.

    Welcome to Good Form Running

    Good Form Running - Learn to run better!

    http://www.goodformrunning.com

    [blackapple]

  • thephoneman said... (original post)

    no matter how fast you're going, you burn about 100 calories per mile. the stuff about hunger and time is all hand waving. i love running, but the important thing to do is find exercise that *you* enjoy and will look forward to doing. you can't lose weight by fixing your diet alone, so find something you enjoy and will do regularly without angst or a lot of motivational tricks.

    also, running isn't bad for your knees if you do it the right way. being fat, however, is very stressful to your knees, ankles, feet, and hips. so find something -- anything -- you enjoy doing and get out and do it.

    Yea, I prefer running at an incline because I don't have a ton of time. Sure, same calories burned/mile, but it takes less time that way. Plus, for whatever reason, running outside gives me shin splints, but doing it on a treadmill doesn't.

    Michigan State does not and will not run the 3-4 defense.

  • snort lots of cocaine...the weight will just fall off.

    Your average UofM fan and I have something in common, neither of us went to UofM. Though we do share One major difference, I got Accepted.

  • SpartanRocky said... (original post)

    Yea, I prefer running at an incline because I don't have a ton of time. Sure, same calories burned/mile, but it takes less time that way. Plus, for whatever reason, running outside gives me shin splints, but doing it on a treadmill doesn't.

    Running (or walking) on an incline definitely boosts calories burned per mile. Because there is no wind resistence on a treadmill, you're actually supposed to bump up the incline a little to get to where you'd be if you were doing the same workout outside. Despite all that, I can never run as far on a treadmill as I can outside. I think boredom is the main factor, although I always plan what TV I'm going to watch at the gym to offset that. Since I don't run when it gets below about 50 degrees, I only run on the treadmill in the winter.

    Treadmills have a little give so your body is just responding to that. You might find running on a trail or grass to be similar to the treadmill, but I think you're in Chicago so that might be harder to do. Running on pavement just always causes problems for many people.

  • MSURed said... (original post)

    Running (or walking) on an incline definitely boosts calories burned per mile. Because there is no wind resistence on a treadmill, you're actually supposed to bump up the incline a little to get to where you'd be if you were doing the same workout outside. Despite all that, I can never run as far on a treadmill as I can outside. I think boredom is the main factor, although I always plan what TV I'm going to watch at the gym to offset that. Since I don't run when it gets below about 50 degrees, I only run on the treadmill in the winter.

    Treadmills have a little give so your body is just responding to that. You might find running on a trail or grass to be similar to the treadmill, but I think you're in Chicago so that might be harder to do. Running on pavement just always causes problems for many people.

    My issue is that I have exercise induced asthma. In addition to my airways closing up a bit, it causes an inflammatory response in the blood vessels going to my arms and legs. I can't just set the treadmill at 7 mph and run for 30 minutes. I have to walk, then run, then walk. I kind of turned it into a game; I sprint for "10 calories", then walk for "10 calories", then sprint, etc. till I'm exhausted. I've knocked out up to 4.5 miles that way. When I say "10 calories", I don't actually think I'm burning that many, I'm just using the calorie counter as a way to gauge. It usually comes out to 25-30 second sprints and 45-50 second walks. It keeps me engaged, and every couple of weeks I up the "sprint" speed by .1 mph. I'm up to 4.0 mph walking and 9.9 mph "sprinting" on a 5% incline (been doing it for about 3 years).

    Michigan State does not and will not run the 3-4 defense.

  • SpartanRocky said... (original post)

    My issue is that I have exercise induced asthma. In addition to my airways closing up a bit, it causes an inflammatory response in the blood vessels going to my arms and legs. I can't just set the treadmill at 7 mph and run for 30 minutes. I have to walk, then run, then walk. I kind of turned it into a game; I sprint for "10 calories", then walk for "10 calories", then sprint, etc. till I'm exhausted. I've knocked out up to 4.5 miles that way. When I say "10 calories", I don't actually think I'm burning that many, I'm just using the calorie counter as a way to gauge. It usually comes out to 25-30 second sprints and 45-50 second walks. It keeps me engaged, and every couple of weeks I up the "sprint" speed by .1 mph. I'm up to 4.0 mph walking and 9.9 mph "sprinting" on a 5% incline (been doing it for about 3 years).

    You're definitely getting the biggest bang for your buck. Intervals are the best way to increase endurance, add strength, and lose fat.

    And you're using the calorie counter correctly by using it as a gauge. Who knows how many calories you're actually burning? It should be used to measure your current workout to past workouts. But too many people think "wow, the elliptical machine said I burned 500 calories, now I can pick up a pepperoni pizza on my way home from the gym".

    Mmmm, pizza. drool

  • Jim Shorts said... (original post)

    Diet sodas are one of the worst things you can put in your body.

    You have absolutely no idea about weight loss and/or diet if you're telling someone to drink these in any way, shape, or form.

    There are any number of products that one can use to wean themselves off of the sugar and caffeine rush of soda, such as coffee, tea, sparkling water…the list goes on and on. The absolute first thing one should cut out of their diets if they are serious about weight loss is soda, diet or otherwise.

    Advocating this makes you about as credible as Dr. Phil.

    Diet sodas are not healthy for you, but it is not one of the worst things you can put in your body. That is hyperbole and over exaggeration at its worst. You are using a straw man to make a point...you distort the original point and then argue against it.

    Getting back to the original point, people can continue to use diet sodas as a crutch if it helps them stick to the plan of staying on a program. Thus, no harm is added because the people are already consuming these beverages. Later, when the person is ready to ween themselves off diet sodas, they should do so. For many people, eating disorders are the cause for obesity. If a person needs to use a zero calorie drink to help sustain the objective of accomplishing the goal of habit change, then they should use this as part of an incremental plan.

    The idea of going cold turkey in any program is idealist. On paper, that idea is the best solution, but in reality, cold turkey plans typically have the lowest success rates when it comes to habit changing and goal achievement.

    Any person that advocates a cold turkey solution to any type of habit change lacks credibility. Unfortunately, in this case, this means you.

  • Wade Garrett said... (original post)

    You're definitely getting the biggest bang for your buck. Intervals are the best way to increase endurance, add strength, and lose fat.

    And you're using the calorie counter correctly by using it as a gauge. Who knows how many calories you're actually burning? It should be used to measure your current workout to past workouts. But too many people think "wow, the elliptical machine said I burned 500 calories, now I can pick up a pepperoni pizza on my way home from the gym".

    Mmmm, pizza. drool

    Yea, if I made it to "400" calories on Monday, I try to hit 410 the next time. I did it incrementally; my first "sprints" were at 6.0 mph. What I'd do is go 15 minutes, sprinting (6.0), and walking (4.0) on the incline; I'd run 5 times over a 2 weeks period (Mon, Wed, Fri one week, Tues, Thurs the next, with weight training on the interval days. Give myself Sat/Sun to rest). So Day 2 of running would be at 18 min at the same pace, then day 3 would be 20 min. Day 4 I'd run 22 min at the pace, day 5 25 . . . then go up to 28 and finally 30 in week 3. On the last day of week 3, I'd go back down to 15 minutes, but do the sprints at 6.1 mph. After awhile I amped it up from .1 increments to between .2 and .5 till I got to 9 mph, then I went a .1 intervals. (I think I said earlier that I did I increased it every 2 weeks, now that I think about it, that's not the case).

    It's kind of rewarding to see that 300 calorie mark coming at the 17 min. mark instead of the 22 min. mark after a year or so.

    Like I said, it took 3 years, but it's definitely a "snowball rolling down a hill thing". Hard to start, but once you get going it's easier and easier. I think I hit 9.9 mph for the sprint about 6 months ago; haven't been able to do it consistently (thanks 247 job + regular work lol) to push up to 10. I had to make it a game/contest with myself to keep me interested, but it's really amazing how many times I've gutted out the last few minutes to make my next "goal". lol

    Edit: A Papa Johns just opened up near me that delivers. I love a lot of the local pizza joints, but I haven't had Papa Johns in ages. Ordered a pizza on Monday night, took 90 minutes, but the driver shows up with a coupon for a free pizza. I exercise a lot so I can do things like eat pizza when I want, but 2 times in a week seems crazy for me lol. Still, free large pizza? That's hard to pass up . . .

    This post has been edited 2 times, most recently by MalibuMan 3 years ago

    Michigan State does not and will not run the 3-4 defense.

  • Dendrobates said... (original post)

    butter and sugar.

    Butter is not fattening within reason.

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    Dr Opti, providing wisdom;one message at a time.

  • thephoneman said... (original post)

    Diet sodas are not healthy for you, but it is not one of the worst things you can put in your body. That is hyperbole and over exaggeration at its worst. You are using a straw man to make a point...you distort the original point and then argue against it.

    Getting back to the original point, people can continue to use diet sodas as a crutch if it helps them stick to the plan of staying on a program. Thus, no harm is added because the people are already consuming these beverages. Later, when the person is ready to ween themselves off diet sodas, they should do so. For many people, eating disorders are the cause for obesity. If a person needs to use a zero calorie drink to help sustain the objective of accomplishing the goal of habit change, then they should use this as part of an incremental plan.

    The idea of going cold turkey in any program is idealist. On paper, that idea is the best solution, but in reality, cold turkey plans typically have the lowest success rates when it comes to habit changing and goal achievement.

    Any person that advocates a cold turkey solution to any type of habit change lacks credibility. Unfortunately, in this case, this means you.

    Totally false my friend.

    Nutrasweet destroys the brain and causes lesions, and also slows the metabolism to prevent serious weight loss.

    Most of the chemicals in diet pop increase hunger, especially if it has caffeine in it.

    signature image

    Dr Opti, providing wisdom;one message at a time.

  • thephoneman said... (original post)

    i definitely agree with you with respect to refined sugars as additive ingredients. HFCS, dextrose, and maltose are the scourge of the processed food industry. certainly a lot of sugar on its own will cause the insulin response to a drastic increase in blood sugar.

    however, you must have missed the part in my post about how most fruits do not cause a spike in blood sugar. it's not the sugar itself, necessarily, but how the body reacts to the food (or processed ingredients that resemble food).

    if you're eating food that comes in a box with an ingredient list, chances are sugar content is too high (to enhance flavor), and is dangerous in that it will cause an insulin response. mangoes, on the other hand, are also very high in sugar and extremely sweet, but they are also off the charts in antioxidant micronutrients to the point that many people consider mangoes to be a superfood.

    Well said.

    signature image

    Dr Opti, providing wisdom;one message at a time.

  • i just ate taco bell, specifically a chicken queso and soft shell taco supreme, but i got a diet coke. Im healthy, right?

  • Optiking said... (original post)

    Totally false my friend.

    Nutrasweet destroys the brain and causes lesions, and also slows the metabolism to prevent serious weight loss.

    Most of the chemicals in diet pop increase hunger, especially if it has caffeine in it.

    From junior Year of College to the summer after I graduated I lost about 75 Lbs (4 years later, I've settled at about 195-200...my low was 183)

    I didn't do anything drastic. Switched from Regular Soda to Diet. Ate fewer things with cheese. Lots of dishes with Grilled Chicken. Exercised more.

    Nobody who was with me everyday even noticed much of a change. But then the people I hadn't seen in 6 months-a year would have their jaws drop. That was a really good feeling.

    This post was edited by vitocorleone 3 years ago

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  • As for permanent lifestyle change, which is required for lasting weight loss, you may want to consider paleo style cooking. In my observation, the more 'raw' the things are you put in your body the better. The advent of modern agriculture coincides with tooth decay and a myriad of health problems man did not have to contend with before. Eat as much like a caveman as you can and you should be well on your way to a better lifestyle.

  • thephoneman said... (original post)

    no matter how fast you're going, you burn about 100 calories per mile. the stuff about hunger and time is all hand waving. i love running, but the important thing to do is find exercise that *you* enjoy and will look forward to doing. you can't lose weight by fixing your diet alone, so find something you enjoy and will do regularly without angst or a lot of motivational tricks.

    also, running isn't bad for your knees if you do it the right way. being fat, however, is very stressful to your knees, ankles, feet, and hips. so find something -- anything -- you enjoy doing and get out and do it.

    Running burns more calories over the same distance because there is a vertical component to your movement during running.

  • vitocorleone said... (original post)

    From junior Year of College to the summer after I graduated I lost about 75 Lbs (4 years later, I've settled at about 195-200...my low was 183)

    I didn't do anything drastic. Switched from Regular Soda to Diet. Ate fewer things with cheese. Lots of dishes with Grilled Chicken. Exercised more.

    Nobody who was with me everyday even noticed much of a change. But then the people I hadn't seen in 6 months-a year would have their jaws drop. That was a really good feeling.

    Congratulations on the great weight loss.

    Anytime you stop consuming HFCS and switch to Diet it will make some difference simply because HFCS often bypasses the liver and stored as fat. When i drink Coke I gain weight quickly as well.

    I think for you the combination of easting healthy (chicken) and less cheese (fat) and exercise made a huge difference. However there is no question that for many people artificial sweeteners are damaging the body and brain and don't boost metabolism.

    signature image

    Dr Opti, providing wisdom;one message at a time.

  • FeMan said... (original post)

    Is there a rationale here or are you just throwing that out.

    You have to be in it for the long haul with weight loss. Running has a significant risk for injury that is not present in walking. I lost 115 pounds in 4 1/2 months walking and controlling intake. If I would have gotten hurt I could have lost a month of exercise.

  • BigDaddyRos said... (original post)

    As for permanent lifestyle change, which is required for lasting weight loss, you may want to consider paleo style cooking. In my observation, the more 'raw' the things are you put in your body the better. The advent of modern agriculture coincides with tooth decay and a myriad of health problems man did not have to contend with before. Eat as much like a caveman as you can and you should be well on your way to a better lifestyle.

    Know anywhere that I get get some wooly mammoth steaks?

    This post was edited by MalibuMan 3 years ago

    Michigan State does not and will not run the 3-4 defense.

  • SpartanRocky said... (original post)

    Know anywhere that I get get some wholly mammoth steaks?

    Uh wooly? Otherwise wholly foods has them.

  • BigDaddyRos said... (original post)

    You have to be in it for the long haul with weight loss. Running has a significant risk for injury that is not present in walking. I lost 115 pounds in 4 1/2 months walking and controlling intake. If I would have gotten hurt I could have lost a month of exercise.

    I like the running for the cardiovascular benefits more than the weight loss. Building muscle is actually a more efficient use of your exercise time compared to running; muscle takes more calories to keep up, so increasing muscle mass will boost the metabolism. The metabolic boost from a weight-training session done right (always the caveat) lasts significantly longer than the boost from running.

    Like most things in life, I've found a balanced approach is best. Mix it up and engaged as many muscle groups as possible; you aren't going to get in shape by bench-pressing and curling alone.

    Michigan State does not and will not run the 3-4 defense.

  • BigDaddyRos said... (original post)

    Uh wooly? Otherwise wholly foods has them.

    roflmao whoops, not enough coffee

    Michigan State does not and will not run the 3-4 defense.

  • Processed corn. Zero nutritional value, and almost no energy offered for workout/daily life.

    This post was edited by Spartan NutsNE1 3 years ago

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  • SpartanRocky said... (original post)

    I like the running for the cardiovascular benefits more than the weight loss. Building muscle is actually a more efficient use of your exercise time compared to running; muscle takes more calories to keep up, so increasing muscle mass will boost the metabolism. The metabolic boost from a weight-training session done right (always the caveat) lasts significantly longer than the boost from running.

    Like most things in life, I've found a balanced approach is best. Mix it up and engaged as many muscle groups as possible; you aren't going to get in shape by bench-pressing and curling alone.

    In theory weightlifting is king. Good luck doing anything but slowing lean body mass loss in a calorie deficit though.

  • Royal

    LP said... (original post)

    Yep. I probably should have have personalized that statement but here are my reasons:

    1. Unless a lifelong runner who loves the running itself, a person will burn out mentally and physically.

    2. If an overweight person runs, much tougher on knees.

    3. Read this in good calories bad calories (not that I believe the whole book) but this made sense as I applied it to myself: running induces hunger and you end up eating more than if you walked or didn't run at all.

    4. Just my take. 3 miles in a workout. At 8a minute mile you're done in 24 minutes, hungry and sore. An hour walk and you've worked out for 36 more minutes, had time to get away from life, and not worked up such an appetite. Unscientific but my personal experience.

    1. True for any physical activity on the face of the planet. I hate walking because it's horribly boring. I don't love walking because its annoying from the mental side of things. Stay away from running because it's mentally tough? Good idea.

    2. Ice them.

    3. Stupidest thing I've ever heard. ALL physical activity induces hunger. If your workout doesn't make you hungrier than usual, you're not working out that hard.

    4. You burn more calories running the same distance than you do walking. You're also using a different set of muscles so comparing the two is irresponsible. If you're sore after 3 miles, you need to see a trainer because your form sucks. You haven't worked up an appetite bc walking for an hour isn't a great workout. That's what most college kids do twice a week while drinking heavily.

  • Royal said... (original post)

    1. True for any physical activity on the face of the planet. I hate walking because it's horribly boring. I don't love walking because its annoying from the mental side of things. Stay away from running because it's mentally tough? Good idea.

    2. Ice them.

    3. Stupidest thing I've ever heard. ALL physical activity induces hunger. If your workout doesn't make you hungrier than usual, you're not working out that hard.

    4. You burn more calories running the same distance than you do walking. You're also using a different set of muscles so comparing the two is irresponsible. If you're sore after 3 miles, you need to see a trainer because your form sucks. You haven't worked up an appetite bc walking for an hour isn't a great workout. That's what most college kids do twice a week while drinking heavily.

    You did read where I said I will personalize this, didn't you? Not gonna argue. This answer is different for everyone. It worked for me and still does.